One day, my grandma came to visit.

 {Yay!}

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When I was a kid, my grandma would always make fresh carrot juice.

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So I decided to make some carrot juice for her!  I’d just gotten a fancy new juicer and was excited to show it off.

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That juicer, like so many of my kitchen gadgets, now sits in my cupboard, unused.

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 Go figure.

Anyway, grandma said she’d love some!

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Because I had a captive audience, I decided to roll my brains all over the counter.

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And the rolling began.

During WWII, The British were just developing airborne radar technology.  To keep their island safe from the Luftwaffe {the Nazi air force}, they built a chain of radar towers along the southern coast.

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Due to this radar technology, the British air force was able to detect the fighters at night, and suddenly their night attacks became deadly accurate.

One of these night fighters was John Cunningham.  He was the first night fighter ace.

BNPS.co.uk (01202 558833) Pic: Spink/BNPS Cats Eyes boarding his Ghost Vampire jet to set a world altitude record in 1948. The outstanding war medals of legendary fighter ace John 'Cat's Eyes' Cunningham have emerged for sale for £200,000. Cunningham's nightfighting skills were put down to eating carrots as part of an Air Ministry ruse to conceal the top secret radar used...and to encourage Britains children to eat more of the humble vegatable. The late Battle of Britain airman was the highest-scoring night-fighter pilot of the Second World War, downing at least 20 German bombers over the English Channel. The sale includes a DSO with 2 bar's, DFC and bar, CBE and even a Russian Order of the Patriotic War, as well as documents and photographs of an extraordinary life.

He was good–very good!–and the British people went crazy after him.  Afraid that their airborne radar secret might get out, the Air Ministry attributed John’s success to one thing:

Carrots.

John ate a lot of carrots, they said, and that’s what made him see so well at night!  The propaganda was rolled out with gusto.

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Even Walt Disney got into the mix, sending three lovable carrot characters to get the word out.  Carroty George, Pop Carrot, Clara Carrot.

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Carrots would help you see in the blackout.

It turns out that this is only kind of true in that if you don’t have vitamin A {found in carrots}, you’ll go blind.  But they don’t give you cat-at-night vision.

John Cunningham was given the nickname “Cat Eyes.”  Which he hated, because it wasn’t true, but he gritted his teeth and played along.  The British people ate it up…literally!  And luckily enough…carrots weren’t rationed during WW2.

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Carrots on a stick…mmmmm!

So that’s the story.  I wonder how many children ended up with orange skin.

During all this, Grandma hadn’t said a thing.

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Lost memories of my childhood suddenly returned.

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It was then I realized I was probably the worst granddaughter ever.

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{She’s still friends with me on Facebook, though!}

{Grandma’s never on Facebook.}

{I’m a terrible granddaughter.}

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